For more information contact: Boonshoft School of Medicine, Judi Engle, Office of Public Relations, (937) 775-2951

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 14, 2000

WSU seeks Patients and Friends of the late Dr. Earl H. Morris

DAYTON, OHIO -- Wright State University School of Medicine is looking for Miami Valley residents who were patients or acquaintances of the late Earl H. Morris, M.D., who practiced medicine in the Dayton area from 1903-1957. An annual public lecture named in honor of Dr. Morris has been endowed at Wright State by his family.

The inaugural Earl H. Morris Lecture will be presented at Wright State on Friday, May 26, by Suzanne Oparil, M.D., past president of the American Heart Association. Her topic will be "Heart Disease in the Third Millennium: Windfall from the Biomedical Revolution."

A presentation and display about the history of medicine in Dr. Morris's lifetime is being assembled in conjunction with the lecture. People who have memories to share about Dr. Morris should contact 937/ 775-2168.

Earl H. Morris was born in Bellbrook, Ohio in 1872. He attended Bellbrook High School, Antioch College, and the University of Michigan.

After graduating from the University of Cincinnati Medical School in 1903, Dr. Morris set up practice in Zimmerman, Ohio, a town that has since become part of suburban Dayton, just a few miles from Wright State. His practice eventually moved to downtown Dayton, first at the corner of Fifth and Wilkinson Streets, then to the Harries Building at First and Main Streets. He practiced medicine at this office until 1955, and continued to see patients at his home until his death in 1957.

In the early years Dr. Morris made house calls by horse and buggy. He was available at all hours, every day, and took no vacations, according to his granddaughter Mariana Morris, Ph.D. She is chair of Wright State's Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, which will sponsor the annual lecture.

"He sent no bills for his services, trusting those who could to pay," she says. "He never denied his services to any person and had an arrangement with a local druggist to honor his prescriptions for those who could not pay."