For more information contact: Boonshoft School of Medicine, Judi Engle, Office of Public Relations, (937) 775-2951

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 19, 1999

Wright State invites public to forum
on "The History of Health in Dayton"

DAYTON, OHIO -- History buffs and people concerned about the future of health in Dayton are invited to participate in a public forum on "The History of Health in Dayton" on Wednesday, May 26, from 6:00-9:00 p.m. at the Patterson Homestead Museum, 1815 Brown Street in Dayton. The event is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested. To register or for more information, call 937/775-1128.

The forum is sponsored by the Patterson Homestead Museum and the Alliance for Research in Community Health (ARCH), a partnership between the Department of Family Medicine at Wright State University School of Medicine and Dayton's Center for Healthy Communities. ARCH's mission is to improve the health of Dayton communities through community-responsive research that promotes active participation by community members.

"The forum will help us to gain a better sense of the current state of health in Dayton by understanding how Dayton's diverse communities have experienced health and health care in the past. We can begin to envision a healthier future if we know where we're at now and where we've come from," says Syed M. Ahmed, M.D., ARCH director and associate professor of family medicine at Wright State. "In addition to local historians and health care professionals, we want to hear from people in the community who have stories to share about the history of health in Dayton," Ahmed says.

Guest speakers include Brian Hackett, executive director of the Montgomery County Historical Society; Drs. Ray Kahn and Alan Klein, retired physicians; Tess Little, director of the Reach Across Dayton program at Sinclair Community College; Sarah Sayre, director of nursing for the Visiting Nurses Association/Combined Health District; LaVerne Sci, manager of the Dunbar House State Memorial Museum; and Dr. F. Bruce Watkins, practicing physician. The discussion moderator is Donna Schlagheck, professor of political science at Wright State University.